Azure

How To Configure Virtual Network Peering in Azure

In this tutorial, I will be guiding you on how to set up a virtual network peering in Azure. Why do we need to set up the virtual network peering? When we have different virtual networks with resources in each network and we need the resources in those different networks to communicate with each other over a low-latency, high-bandwidth connection using the Microsoft backbone network. When we are done creating the virtual network peering it will enable us to connect two or more Virtual Networks in Azure and the resources in those networks will communicate with each other. What is Azure Virtual Network? Azure Virtual Network is the fundamental building block for your private network in Azure. A virtual network enables many types of Azure resources, such as Azure Virtual Machines (VM), to securely communicate with each other, the internet, and on-premises networks. A virtual network is similar to a traditional network that you’d operate in your own data center. An Azure Virtual Network brings with it extra benefits of Azure’s infrastructure such as scale, availability, and isolation. Virtual Network Peering? Virtual network peering links virtual networks, enabling you to route traffic between them using private IP addresses. Ingress and egress traffic is charged at both ends of the peered networks. Supported Peering in Azure; Virtual network peering: Connecting virtual networks within the same Azure region. Global virtual network peering: Connecting virtual networks across Azure regions. Build in the cloud with an Azure free account Are you ready to follow along with this tutorial? If your answer is Yes! Then click here to register for Azure Subscription. Virtual Network pricing Virtual Network in Azure is free of charge. Every subscription can create up to 50 Virtual Networks across all regions. Inbound and outbound traffic is charged at both ends of the peered networks. Network appliances such as VPN Gateway and Application Gateway that are run inside a virtual network are also charged. Click the link to read more: Virtual Network Pricing | Microsoft Azure Overview We will be creating two virtual networks and we will be naming them abcofcloudVNetHQ and abcofcloudVNetBranch, after creating the virtual networks, we will then create two virtual machines named VM1 and VM2. VM1 will be placed in a subnet in abcofcloudVNetHQ and VM2 will be placed in a subnet in abcofcloudVNetBranch. Creating a Virtual Network We will start with creating the abcofcloudVNetHQ. Step 1: Sign into the Azure Portal. Step 2: Search for virtual network in the Azure portal search box. Step 3: In the search results, select virtual network right under Marketplace. Step 5: Under the Basics tab, choose the Subscription you want to use for this virtual network. Step 6: A Resource group can be selected from the existing resource group, or a new resource group can be created by clicking on Create new. We will be using the abcofcloudRG for this tutorial. Step 7: Enter a preferred name for the virtual network, for this tutorial, we will be naming the virtual network abcofcloudVNetHQ. Step 8: Choose a preferred location for the virtual network, by clicking on the drop-down and selecting the region you prefer, and then clicking on Next at the bottom, we will be using the UK South for this tutorial. For this tutorial, we will leave the Security tab with the default settings and click on Next. We will be using the 172.20.0.0/16 for our address space and for the subnet, we will be using 172.20.0.0/24 for the Subnet Address range. Step 9: Click on the 3 dots beside the Add a subnet and then click on the Delete address space. Step 10: click on the Add an IP address space, and select the IPv4 with the Starting address as 172.20.0.0, the Address space size will be /16 (65536 addresses) then click on Add. Step 11: Select the + Add a subnet button and enter the HQSubnet1 for the Subnet Name and the Starting address as 172.20.0.0 with the Subnet size as /24 (256 addresses) and then click on Add. Once that is done click on Review + Create and select Create. What we need to do next is create the second Virtual Network which is abcofcloudVNetBranch using the same procedure from Step 1 to Step 11 but we just need to make a few changes. Resource group: abcofcloudRG Virtual network name: abcofcloudVNetBranch Region: UK South IP Address space: 172.22.0.0/16 Subnet name: BranchSubnet1 Starting Address: 172.22.0.0 Subnet size: /24 (256 addresses). Bonus: After creating both virtual networks, in the search box at the top type Network Watcher and on the Network Watcher page click on Topology. Select the Subscription and the Resource Group, you will see both virtual networks and their subnets, but once the peering is added you will see a line showing the peering has been added.   Creating a Virtual Network Peer This is the point where we will peer the virtual networks, for us to do that we need to locate the virtual network we created. We can either do this by going to the Resource group “abcofcloudRG” or using the search box. Step 1: Search for abcofcloudVNetHQ in the Azure portal search box and select it. Step 2: On the abcofcloudVNetHQ virtual network page, click on Peerings Under the Settings area and then click on + Add. Once that is done, we need to add peering from this virtual network “abcofcloudVNetHQ” to the remote virtual network “abcofcloudVNetBranch”. Step 3: Now that we are on the Add peering page, we need to choose a preferred name for the peering link name for this virtual network, and for this tutorial, I will be using the abcofcloudVNetHQ-to-abcofcloudVNetBranch. Step 4: Since the goal is to allow resources in both virtual networks to communicate, for Traffic to remote virtual network, I will leave it on Allow(default), and for Traffic forwarded from a remote virtual network, I will leave it on Allow(default).  The Virtual network gateway or Route Server will be None(default). Step 5: Now it is time to give

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How to Configure Site-to-Site VPN Connection on Azure

This post will show you how to create a Site-to-Site VPN gateway using Azure. And I will not just stop at creating it, I will also show a test sample of the connection working. Yes, that’s how I roll, you have to see what you’re configuring working in real-time. Things to consider before creating a site-to-site VPN: If you’re unfamiliar with the IP address ranges located in your on-premises network configuration, you need to coordinate with someone who can provide those details for you. When you create this configuration, you must specify the IP address range prefixes that Azure will route to your on-premises location. None of the subnets of your on-premises network can overlap with the virtual network subnets that you want to connect to. What is Site-to-Site VPN Site-to-Site VPN gateway connection is used to connect your on-premises network to an Azure virtual network over an IPsec/IKE (IKEv1 or IKEv2) VPN tunnel. This type of connection requires a VPN device located on-premises that has an externally facing public IP address assigned to it. What is a VPN Gateway A VPN gateway is a type of virtual network gateway that sends encrypted traffic between your virtual network and your on-premises location across a public connection. You can also use a VPN gateway to send traffic between virtual networks across the Azure backbone. What is a Local Network Gateway A local network gateway is a specific object that represents your on-premises location (the site) for routing purposes. A local network gateway is used to establish a secure, encrypted connection between your on-premises network and your Azure virtual network. This enables you to extend your on-premises network to the cloud and access resources in Azure as if they were located on your local network. You give the site a name by which Azure can refer to it, then specify the IP address of the on-premises VPN device to which you’ll create a connection. You also specify the IP address prefixes that will be routed through the VPN gateway to the VPN device. The address prefixes you specify are the prefixes located on your on-premises network. What we will need to Configure the Site-to-Site VPN. Virtual Network VPN Gateway Local Gateway Connecting Routing and Remote Access If you have read my previous post about Point-to-Site VPN you should be familiar with some of them.   Creating a Virtual Network Firstly, we need to create a Virtual Network Step 1: Sign in to the Azure Portal. Step 2: Search for virtual network in Azure portal. Step 3: In the search results, select virtual network right under Marketplace. Step 4: On the Virtual network page, click on Create. Step 5: Under the Basics tab, choose the Subscription you want to use for this project. Step 6: Resource group can be selected from existing resource group, or a new resource group can be created by clicking on Create new. Step 7: Enter a preferred name for the virtual network. Step 8: Choose a preferred location for the Virtual Network, by clicking on the drop-down and selecting the region you prefer, and then click on next at the bottom. Note: The location determines where the resources that you deploy to this VNet will live. For this tutorial, we will leave the Security tab with the default settings and then click on next again. We will be using the 172.16.0.0/16 for our address space and for the subnet we will create two subnets: abcofcloudsubnet with a subnet address space of 172.16.0.0/24. Step 9: On the IP addresses tab click on the Add an IP address space and select the Address space type radio button for IPv4. Starting address type 172.16.0.0, Address space size use the drop-down to select /16 (65536 addresses) and click the Add button. Step 10: After this has been added you can now delete the default address space. Step 11: This is the time we add our subnet, click on the plus(+) button beside Add a subnet, and on the pop-out button by the right under the Subnet details enter a preferred name, for this tutorial I will be using abcofcloudsubnet, the Starting address as 172.16.0.0 and Subnet size as /24 (256 addresses) then click on the Add button. Step 12: Click on the Review + Create button to have an overview of your settings and then click Create. Let’s Create the VPN Gateway Step 1: Search for Virtual network gateway in Azure portal. Step 2: In the Search result, under Marketplace select Virtual network gateway. Step 3: Choose the subscription you want from the drop-down. Step 4: The Resource Group will be auto-filled when we select the virtual network. Step 5: Enter any preferred name for your gateway. Step 6: We will be using VPN as the Gateway type in this tutorial. Step 7: Route-based is the VPN type we will be using for this tutorial, this can be selected based on your requirement or business need. Step 8: SKU will be VpnGw2AZ for this tutorial, I will be adding some links where you can learn more about the SKU, resizing, and zone redundant. Step 9: Generation2 will be the choice for this tutorial. Step 10: Our Virtual network will be the one we created previously. Step 11. You can either create a subnet in your virtual subnet with the name Gatewaysubnet or you get the Gateway subnet address range automatically. Step 12: We will change the default Gateway subnet address range to 172.16.1.0/27 or larger which is (/26,/25,/24, etc.)  Anything lesser will throw an error if you’re trying to deploy a zone-redundant/zonal gateway and also this allows enough IP addresses for future changes. Step 13: Public IP address is set to Create new; you can choose to use existing if you already have one created. These settings specify the public IP address object that gets associated with the VPN gateway. The public IP address is assigned to this object when the VPN gateway is created. The only time the primary Public

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How to Configure Point-to-Site VPN on Azure

Point-to-Site VPN helps us connect through a secure network from a client computer to an Azure virtual network. This simply means you can connect to a compute resource using their private IP on the Azure Virtual Network. What is Point-to-Site VPN A Point-to-Site (P2S) VPN gateway connection lets you create a secure connection to your virtual network from an individual client computer. A P2S connection is established by starting it from the client’s computer. This solution is useful for telecommuters who want to connect to Azure VNets from a remote location, such as from home or a conference. P2S VPN is also a useful solution to use instead of S2S VPN when you have only a few clients that need to connect to a VNet. What is a VPN Gateway A VPN gateway is a type of virtual network gateway that sends encrypted traffic between your virtual network and your on-premises location across a public connection. You can also use a VPN gateway to send traffic between virtual networks across the Azure backbone. Creating a Virtual Network Firstly, we need to create a Virtual Network Step 1: Sign in to the Azure Portal. Step 2: Search for virtual network in Azure portal. Step 3: In the search results, select virtual network right under Marketplace. Step 4: On the Virtual network page, click on Create. Step 5: Under the Basics tab, choose the Subscription you want to use for this project. Step 6: Resource group can be selected from existing resource group, or a new resource group can be created by clicking on Create new. Step 7: Enter a preferred name for the virtual network. Step 8: Choose a preferred location for the Virtual Network, by clicking on the drop-down and selecting the region you prefer, and then click on next at the bottom. Note: The location determines where the resources that you deploy to this VNet will live. For this tutorial, we will leave the Security tab with the default settings and then click on next again. We will be using the 172.16.0.0/16 for our address space and for the subnet we will create two subnets: abcofcloudsubnet with a subnet address space of 172.16.0.0/24. Step 9: On the IP addresses tab click on the Add an IP address space and select the Address space type radio button for IPv4. Starting address type 172.16.0.0, Address space size use the drop-down to select /16 (65536 addresses) and click the Add button. Step 10: After this has been added you can now delete the default address space. Step 11: This is the time we add our subnet, click on the plus(+) button beside Add a subnet, and on the pop-out button by the right under the Subnet details enter a preferred name, for this tutorial I will be using abcofcloudsubnet, the Starting address as 172.16.0.0 and Subnet size as /24 (256 addresses) then click on the Add button. Step 12: Click on the Review + Create button to have an overview of your settings and then click Create. Let’s Create the VPN Gateway Step 1: Search for Virtual network gateway in Azure portal. Step 2: In the Search result, under Marketplace select Virtual network gateway. Step 3: Choose the subscription you want from the drop-down. Step 4: The Resource Group will be auto-filled when we select the virtual network. Step 5: Enter any preferred name for your gateway. Step 6: We will be using VPN as the Gateway type in this tutorial. Step 7: Route-based is the VPN type we will be using for this tutorial, this can be selected based on your requirement or business need. Step 8: SKU will be VpnGw2AZ for this tutorial, I will be adding some links where you can learn more about the SKU, resizing, and zone redundant. Step 9: Generation2 will be the choice for this tutorial. Step 10: Our Virtual network will be the one we created previously. Step 11. You can either create a subnet in your virtual subnet with the name Gatewaysubnet or you get the Gateway subnet address range automatically. Step 12: We will change the default Gateway subnet address range to 172.16.1.0/27 or larger which is (/26,/25,/24, etc.)  Anything lesser will throw an error if you’re trying to deploy a zone-redundant/zonal gateway and also this allows enough IP addresses for future changes. Step 13: Public IP address is set to Create new; you can choose to use existing if you already have one created. These settings specify the public IP address object that gets associated with the VPN gateway. The public IP address is assigned to this object when the VPN gateway is created. The only time the primary Public IP address changes is when the gateway is deleted and re-created. It doesn’t change across resizing, resetting, or other internal maintenance/upgrades of your VPN gateway. Step 14: Enter a preferred name for the Public IP address name. The Assignment setting is controlled by the Public IP Address Type value. Enable active-active mode and Configure BGP will be disabled in this tutorial. Step 15: Click on Review + Create and then Create. Tags can be added based on your requirements. Once you hit the Create button, it’s time to go get a bottle of drink because I also paused and went to a bottle of drink. Also, make sure you don’t refresh the page because it can take 45 minutes or more to fully create and deploy. You will see the status of the deployment on the overview page for the gateway. Welcome from the short break, the next thing we will be doing is creating a Self-Sign root and client certificate. Creating Self-Signed Certificate Step 1: Open PowerShell with elevated privileges from a computer running Windows 10 or later, or Windows Server 2016. Step 2: Copy and paste the cmdlet below on PowerShell. This cmdlet will create a self-signed root certificate named ‘abcofcloudP2SRootCert’ that is automatically installed in ‘Certificates-Current User\Personal\Certificates’. If you want to use your preferred name modify the

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How to Configure Azure File Sync

Over the years there have different ways files are shared and how access is given to people. One of the popular ways of sharing files has been mapping drives from servers to domain-joined computers in the organization. I will be showing how files can be shared using Azure File Sync making the files to be highly available across the organization. The files are automatically replicated on the server to a central Azure storage location, allowing cloud tiering which allows files that are not often used to be moved from on-premises to Azure Storage while the frequently accessed files are cached on the local server and the amount of local disk space used for caching can be controlled. Administrators continue to support local data access and permissions.   What is Azure File Sync? Azure File Sync enables centralizing your organization’s file shares in Azure Files while keeping the flexibility, performance, and compatibility of a Windows file server. While some users may opt to keep a full copy of their data locally, Azure File Sync additionally has the ability to transform Windows Server into a quick cache of your Azure file share. You can use any protocol that’s available on Windows Server to access your data locally, including SMB, NFS, and FTPS. You can have as many caches as you need across the world. Now that we know what Azure File Sync is let’s go straight to setting one up. I have a computer that is domain joined to the server and another that is not and I will create a file share drive that will be mapped to the computer that is not domain joined while on the other hand, I will map a network drive from my local server to the domain joined computer. At the end of this, you will see how the file will be available to all devices and how files from the local server will be synced to the cloud. Creating a Storage Account Step 1: Sign into the Azure portal Step 2: Under Azure services, select Storage account or search for Storage and select the Storage accounts.   Step 3:  On the Storage Accounts page, click on create. Step 3: On the Basics blade, select the Subscription, the desired Resource group, or create a new Resource group. Step 4: Enter the name of your storage account, for this tutorial we will be using abcofcloudstorage. The name must be unique across Azure. The name must also be between 3 and 24 characters long and may include only numbers and lowercase letters. Step 5: Select the region for the storage account. Step 6: Select the performance tier for the storage account. Step 7: Choose how you want the Storage account to be replicated. Step 8: Additional options are available on the Advanced which you can select based on your requirement. Step 9: Select Review + Create to have a review of all the options you selected then Click on Create. Creating a File Share Now that we are done with creating the Storage account, we will go ahead to view the storage account and create a file share. Step 1: Click on the storage account (abcofcloudstorage) that was created. Step 2: From the left menu, Under Data storage select File shares then click on the plus (+) button beside File share. Step 3: On the right pop-out, Name the New file share, for this tutorial we will be using abcofcloud-hrdept leave the tier set to Transaction optimized and then select Create. Step 4: Now double-click on the new File share you created. Step 5: Now click on Upload then on the pop up click on the folder icon. You can browse through your local disk and select any file you want to upload and Click the upload button.   What we will be doing now is connecting this New File share to a computer that is not domain-joined to our local server just to show how every file will sync together at the end. Connecting Azure File Share from Windows Step 1: Click on the Connect button on the pop-out by the right, select Windows, and Under the Drive, letter select the letter you want to use for the drive from the drop-down. Step 2: Choose the Storage account key and copy the script that will be displayed to you. Step 3: Log in to the computer, Open PowerShell and paste the script, then hit the enter key.     Now that we have successfully created and connected the file share to our computer we can then move to the next part. We will be creating the Azure File Sync Step 1: Search for the Azure File Sync in Azure portal. Step 2: In the search results, select Azure File Sync. Step 3: Select create to open the Deploy Azure File Sync tab. Step 4: Select the Subscription. Step 5: Select the desired Resource Group. Step 6: Give the Storage sync service name a unique name, we will be using abcofcloudsyncfile. Step 7: The Networking and tags can be selected based on your requirements and after that click on Review and create.   Creating the Sync Group A sync group defines the sync topology for a set of files. A sync group must contain one cloud endpoint, which represents an Azure file share. A sync group also must contain one or more server endpoints. A server endpoint represents a path on a registered server. To create a sync group: Step 1: Go to the Resource Group and select the Storage Sync Service we just created. Step 2: On the left menu under Sync, select the Sync groups and then click on the plus(+) button to add a Sync group. Step 3: Name the Sync group with a name that is unique within the Storage Sync Service, but can be any name that is logical for you. Step 4: Select the subscription where the Storage Sync Service is deployed. Step 5: Select the storage account of the Azure

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Cloud Computing Explained

If you’re about to start your journey to the cloud, this post is right for you. You probably might have heard someone talking or mentioning cloud computing, and you’re here to understand what cloud computing is. Let me give a little scenario, you have an organization, with a physical data center where you have servers, switches, storage devices, and networks all set up and ready for business. Imagine you do have an event that comes up once annually that will consume a lot of those resources which will require you to get either more servers or other resources to handle the services you will be providing and after the event those servers will be under use, from the narration you can see that you will have to spend more to handle a one-time service you needed to provide, this method of running software and hardware is what is referred to as On-Premises. What is Cloud Computing? Cloud Computing means storing of your IT resources in the cloud and running them over the internet on a pay-as-you-go basis. I can then define cloud computing as the delivery of on-demand computing services which includes storage, servers, network, database, email, intelligence, analytics, and application over the internet on a pay-as-you-go basis. The cloud is just a big data center (big building with servers) located at a different location and they are networked together and can also be accessed over the internet, they are owned by cloud providers, examples of these cloud providers are Microsoft, Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud Platform, VMware, IBM Cloud Services, Salesforce, etc. If we try to connect this to the scenario I gave previously it simply means when you have an event that will require more services instead of buying new servers or storage devices, you can just pay for more resources when you need them, helping you scale your business need.   Type of Cloud Computing When talking about types of cloud computing can be categorized into two: The Deployment Model and Service Model can also be referred to as types of cloud and types of cloud services respectively.   Deployment Model (Types of Cloud) I want to tell you a little story before talking about the types of cloud computing. I remember working in an organization in which I was required to come to the office every working day. I had different options for getting to the office depending on some conditions. The first condition is if I really want to be comfortable and keep my things anyhow I want them then I always choose the option of driving myself to the office but the cons to me going to work with my private car was I spend extra on fuel and maintenance of my car so when I think about this I go with another option which is ordering a ride to come to pick me, this other option was good because I still have a bit of privacy to some extent and at the same time I don’t need to fuel the car and take care of the maintenance which is fair to me but also I have one other option which is cheaper compare to the previous option which is taking public transport but then the comfort can’t compare to previous options I mentioned but then I pay less and I don’t have to think about how the car is been maintained. I will be explaining each of the deployment models but before I do you can always connect the first option I gave to the private cloud, the second option to the hybrid cloud, and the third option to the public cloud. Private Clouds are reserved exclusively for one business or organization. It can be managed on-premises or off-premises by a third-party service provider. Public Clouds are owned by cloud providers, they provide computing services to the public over the internet and are shared by multiple customers. Hybrid Clouds are a combination of both the public cloud and private cloud services or functionalities. You choose which of the data are to be stored on the private cloud and which are to be stored on the public cloud based on organization needs.   Community Cloud is when a group of organizations shares similar services on a sub-private cloud that can be managed internally or by a third-party provider and is designed to meet a specific community need.   Service Model (Type of Cloud Services) Now that we know what Cloud Computing has to do with delivering computing resources then we can now go ahead to see how they are been categorized. Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS): it typically provides IT infrastructure resources over the internet such as network, servers, and storage on a pay-as-you-go basis. The customers are responsible for managing the operating system, middleware, and application that runs on the IT infrastructure. Platform as a Service: it provides services for developing, testing, and management of applications. The customer focus on just the coding and building of the application without the need to worry about the underlying infrastructure. Software as a Service: It provides computing service through a software application over the internet, it is typically usually accessed through the web browser. It eliminates the need for the end-user to manage the underlying infrastructure and any other maintenance. Benefits of Cloud Computing Cost Saving: With the cloud, you can now pay for what you use which reduces the cost compared to buying IT resources required to set up an on-premises data center. Security: Data stored in the cloud are secured, and the cloud provider ensures that data stored are kept secure with the use of their broad set of policies and technologies. Scalability: It is easier to scale up and down your IT resources when needed without the stress of physical limitation, with this you can easily meet up with your business need as it changes.    

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